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Editing and Revising Resources

Learn about self-editing strategies, how to work effectively with an academic editor, and tips for reviewing other people's writing

Revising tips

  1. Compare the assignment description to the work; does the work meet all the requirements?
  2. Does the work have a clear and logical structure? For example, does the work begin with a clear thesis statement or research question, and do the body paragraphs stay on topic? If you used a plan while writing, does the work match the plan? If you didn’t plan the writing, try using a planning template (e.g., Finalize Your Document Plan) to analyze the work and identify which elements are in place, as well as which elements need to be added.
  3. Are the paragraphs presented in a logical order? To check, write your thesis statement at the top of a page, and then list the topic sentence of every paragraph that follows.
  4. Have you supported all your claims with relevant and appropriate evidence? Have you explained how the evidence supports the claims?
  5. Does the work rely heavily on direct quotations? To improve the flow of the text and demonstrate your understanding of the material, could you instead paraphrase some of the quotations?
  6. Could someone else who isn’t familiar with your topic or assignment understand your discussion? If possible, ask a friend or a colleague who isn't an expert in the topic to read the work and indicate where they struggled to understand it.

Revising resources

Using an outline to revise your draft:

Improving clarity and coherence:

Structuring arguments and paragraphs